Could AA Be Right for Me?

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, “Despite developments in medications and behavioral therapies, mutual-help groups remain the most commonly sought source of help for alcohol use disorders in the United States.” Alcoholics Anonymous is easily the most popular of these groups and has the largest following. But how can you know if AA is right for you?

12-Step Facilitation Therapy

If you are unsure if AA is right for you and you require guidance from a professional therapist, consider attending 12-step facilitation therapy. This treatment is “designed to increase the likelihood of a substance abuser becoming affiliated with and actively involved in [a] 12-step self-help group” (National Institute on Drug Abuse). 12-step facilitation therapy helps dispel the myths about 12-step programs like AA and allows patients to understand the philosophies of the program before they begin to attend meetings. It can be very helpful in easing one into the process of AA.

Consider Your Needs

support group

Peer support can help you stay sober.

Are you in need of an additional treatment to supplement your professional treatment program? Or perhaps you have already received professional treatment and want to attend an aftercare program that is cost-effective and flexible. Maybe you require these two factors above all else. Once you begin to consider your needs, you can discover if AA is truly right for you.

If you are not currently in need of a stronger treatment option––or if you’re considering AA as a supplement to one––the program could be a good choice for your current stage of recovery. Many people also need treatment that provides them with a strong social support system, something with which AA can be very helpful. It is also important to consider your background as well as your age, gender, spiritual or religious beliefs, ethnicity, and other factors that make up who you are. These could influence the way you may or may not feel like you belong in the program.

Is AA Right for You?

Ask yourself the questions below. Try to answer honestly, and consider how your answers could affect your comfort level within AA and the way you will be able to work within the program.

  • Do you believe abstinence is the best way to stop abusing alcohol?
  • Do you think having more friends to help you stay abstinent will be beneficial to your recovery?
  • Do you feel powerless against your ability to stop drinking?
  • Do you believe in a higher power?
  • Are you happiest or most comfortable when you are part of a group?
  • Is it helpful to you when you feel you are not alone in your problems?
  • Do you feel that you would be able to attend meetings with regularity?
  • Are you looking for a flexible treatment option?
  • Are you looking for a cost-effective treatment option?
  • Do you feel it is time to make a change in your life regarding your alcohol use?

If you answered yes to many of the questions above, AA could very likely be a beneficial treatment option or you.

Do You Want to Find AA Meetings in Your Area?

Call 800-839-1686. We can help you find a meeting as well as answer any questions you may have about AA.

Close

How our helpline works

For those seeking addiction treatment for themselves or a loved one, the AlcoholicsAnonymous.com helpline is a private and convenient solution.

Calls to any general helpline (non-facility specific 1-8XX numbers) for your visit will be answered by American Addiction Centers (AAC).

We are standing by 24/7 to discuss your treatment options. Our representatives work solely for AAC and will discuss whether an AAC facility may be an option for you. Our helpline is offered at no cost to you and with no obligation to enter into treatment. Neither AlcoholicsAnonymous.com nor AAC receives any commission or other fee that is dependent upon which treatment provider a visitor may ultimately choose.

For more information on AAC’s commitment to ethical marketing and treatment practices, or to learn more about how to select a treatment provider, visit our About AAC page. If you wish to explore additional treatment options or connect with a specific rehab center, you can browse top-rated listings or visit SAMHSA.