9 Questions to Ask Yourself if You Suspect You are Addicted to Alcohol

Many people say that if you are wondering whether you are addicted to alcohol or not, you are probably addicted to alcohol. This is not necessarily true. Although drinking too much can cause physical harm, questioning your drinking is a healthy thing. According to the Centers for Disease Control, excessive drinking is four to five drinks a day. If you are drinking this much or beyond frequently, you might have a problem. There are other questions you can ask yourself to determine whether you are addicted to alcohol or not.

1. Is Drinking Affecting Your Home Life?

When drinking starts arguments at home and with your family, alcoholism is probably the problem. When your family is affected by your drinking or when they ask you to stop drinking then alcohol addiction is usually to blame.

2.  Is Drinking Affecting Your Work?

If you are consistently late or absent from work due to your drinking, your drinking is probably out of control. One bad night is understandable but when it happens over and over again, there could be a serious issue.

3.  Do you Drink to Combat Social Anxiety?

Suspect You are Addicted to Alcohol

Drinking in order to combat social anxiety is a sign of alcohol addiction.

If you are drinking to combat social anxiety or any other mental health issue, then there is definitely a problem. Alcohol does not solve problems it creates them. Most people who drink to solve problems wind up in worse trouble than when they started.

4.  Are you Careless when you are Drinking?

If you take risks when you are drinking or drink and drive, there is a chance there is a problem. Most people who drink responsibly do not get into trouble with the law or in trouble in general.

5.  Do you Lose Control of your Emotions or Self when you are Drinking?

If you find yourself losing control of your anger or you always wind up crying when you drink you are probably drinking too much. Most people do not lose control of their emotions when they drink.

6.  Do you Crave Alcohol when you Cannot Have it?

If you crave alcohol when you cannot drink, such as while you are at work or school. You probably have a drinking problem. Most people who have an alcohol problem crave alcohol constantly.

7.  Does not Having Alcohol Available Cause you Anxiety?

Along with cravings not having alcohol, causes anxiety in those that are alcoholics. They get anxious and irritable if they know they do not have an immediate source of alcohol. Most people who feel this already know they have a problem with drinking.

Signs That You’re Self-Medicating with Alcohol and When to Consider Alcohol Addiction Treatment

8.  Do you Still Want to Drink After Having Been Drunk Earlier?

Wanting to continue drinking even if you are still drunk from the night before or if you are hung over is a classic sign of alcohol addiction. If you want to continue drinking despite the negative consequences, you definitely have a problem.

9.  Do you Want Treatment for Alcohol Addiction?

If you are thinking that you need treatment for alcohol addiction, then you probably do. Alcohol addiction treatment is not difficult to find. For more information on alcohol addiction or addiction treatment call us at 800-839-1686.

Close

How our helpline works

For those seeking addiction treatment for themselves or a loved one, the AlcoholicsAnonymous.com helpline is a private and convenient solution.

Calls to any general helpline (non-facility specific 1-8XX numbers) for your visit will be answered by American Addiction Centers (AAC).

We are standing by 24/7 to discuss your treatment options. Our representatives work solely for AAC and will discuss whether an AAC facility may be an option for you. Our helpline is offered at no cost to you and with no obligation to enter into treatment. Neither AlcoholicsAnonymous.com nor AAC receives any commission or other fee that is dependent upon which treatment provider a visitor may ultimately choose.

For more information on AAC’s commitment to ethical marketing and treatment practices, or to learn more about how to select a treatment provider, visit our About AAC page. If you wish to explore additional treatment options or connect with a specific rehab center, you can browse top-rated listings or visit SAMHSA.