5 Questions to Ask Your Doctor About AA

Many people who decide to attend professional rehab can also attend AA during their program. However, there are a number of questions you should ask your rehab doctor before beginning the 12 steps to ensure that you are ready for AA and that it will be helpful to you. Call 800-839-1686Who Answers? to find rehab centers that will cater to your needs and offer peer support group meetings as part of their treatment.

1. “How Can I Find My Higher Power?”

Finding and giving oneself over to a “power greater than ourselves” is one of the most principle parts of the AA practice, according to the 12 steps (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration).

Obviously, your doctor will not be able to make this decision for you, nor will they be able to tell you what path is best for you (religious or nonreligious, etc.). They may, however, be able to give you some insight about where to look for your higher power, discuss possible options with you, and help you find the version that works best for your particular needs.

2. “Do I Have to Stay Sober?”

About AA

Your doctor can help determine whether or not AA would benefit you.

Abstinence is one of the principle concepts of AA, and for many alcoholics, it is unsafe to ever begin drinking again. Getting the professional opinion of your doctor is very important, but it is likely they will tell you abstinence is the safest route, especially during early recovery. Still, it can be very helpful to hear this advice from a licensed health care provider.

3. “Is AA Effective?”

The US Department of Veteran Affairs states that twelve-step self-help groups “provide continuing support, goal direction, and structure… rewarding, substance-free activities; a forum wherein individuals can express their feelings in a safe setting,” and a number of other benefits for those who attend them.

Though this is common knowledge, your doctor can also show you the effectiveness of AA as a supplement to professional treatment and how, when both options are utilized together, patients normally have a better outcome than when either is used alone.

4. “Is a Particular Rumor About AA True?”

There is quite a bit of information about AA online as well as common beliefs about the program, but being able to talk to your doctor directly about any rumors you may have heard can alleviate your fears. In addition, your rehab doctor will have considerable experience and knowledge associated with treating addiction, which will make their word much more reliable.

10 Most Asked Questions About Alcoholics Anonymous

5. “Is AA Right for Me?”

AA isn’t right for everyone, but once you find a rehab facility that caters to your needs, you can discuss with your doctor whether or not it may be for you. Once you are able to build a strong relationship with your addiction treatment doctor, they can begin to help you find the best options for your recovery in order to build a plan perfect for your needs.

Seek Professional Rehab Now

We can assist you in finding a rehab center that can help you end your substance abuse and begin your recovery in the safest, most effective way possible, as well as find out if AA should be a part of your treatment program. Call 800-839-1686Who Answers? today.

How the helpline works

For those seeking addiction treatment for themselves or a loved one, the AlcoholicsAnonymous.com helpline is a private and convenient solution.

Calls to any general helpline (non-facility specific 1-8XX numbers) for your visit will be answered by American Addiction Centers (AAC), a paid advertiser on AlcoholicsAnonymous.com.

AAC representatives are standing by 24/7 to discuss your treatment options. These representatives work solely for AAC and will discuss whether an AAC facility may be an option for you. This helpline is offered at no cost to you and with no obligation to enter into treatment. Neither AlcoholicsAnonymous.com nor AAC receives any commission or other fee that is dependent upon which treatment provider a visitor may ultimately choose.

For more information on AAC’s commitment to ethical marketing and treatment practices, or to learn more about how to select a treatment provider, visit AmericanAddictionCenters.org. If you wish to explore additional treatment options or connect with a specific rehab center, you can browse top-rated listings or visit SAMHSA.