What If My Family Doesn’t Want Me to Join AA?

Addiction can be immensely difficult on families, and deciding on a treatment option that pleases everyone can also be problematic. The important thing to remember when searching for a recovery program is to find one that works for you. But there are ways to help your family members understand AA if they are skeptical about it. If you have been struggling with alcoholism or alcohol abuse and want to find out more about Alcoholics Anonymous, call 800-839-1686 today.

Helping Family Members Understand AA

Join AA

Find research to backup the effectiveness of AA and show your family.

Are you comforted and intrigued by the ideas put forth in AA and believe that the program will be beneficial to you, even though your family does not like it? There are ways to help your loved ones understand how AA can be a good choice for your addiction recovery and how they can make better sense of the program itself.

  • According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, “The efficacy of 12-step programs… in treating alcohol dependence has been established,” and there are many studies that show how these programs are helpful to alcoholics. Do a little research, and show your family members what you find out.
  • Take your loved one to 12-step facilitation therapy. Counselors who practice this treatment option want to help addicts transition into 12-step programs like AA by busting the myths that surround these groups and helping them understand how they can be helpful. Your family members will likely gain some insight by attending as well.
  • Go to an open AA meeting with your family members so they can see what the group is actually like. At these meetings, members are prepared for non-members to visit and have questions about the program so it is a perfect time for you both to see what things are like on the inside.
  • Ask your family members to attend Al-Anon. These meetings are similar to AA, but they are specifically for the friends and family of addicts. The members of this group discuss their feelings with one another and follow the 12 steps in order to better help themselves and their loved ones.

Compromise With Your Loved Ones

If your family still wants you to attend traditional treatment in place of AA, there are many programs that utilize medication, behavioral therapy, and AA meetings for alcohol abuse recovery. Especially if a doctor has told you that you may require more traditional treatment either before or in addition to AA, you may want to consider this option and make a compromise.

Helping Your Family and Friends Understand AA

Your Treatment, Your Choice

All in all, though, if you believe AA will be helpful to you, then it likely will be. As the NIDA states, “No single treatment is right for everyone,” and those in recovery need to be able to choose the treatment option that is best for them. Family members and their feelings are important and should be considered. However, if you believe AA will help you, then your decision to join the program is valid.

If you would like to learn more about AA or find a meeting in your area, please call 800-839-1686. We can answer any questions you have about the program and help you begin your journey of recovery.

How Our Helpline Works

If you're seeking addiction treatment for yourself or a loved one, the AlcoholicsAnonymous.com helpline offers a convenient and private solution to assist you. Our caring treatment advisors are ready to take your call anytime, day or night. Calls are answered 24/7 to discuss treatment and recovery options.

Your call is routed to a general helpline call center where caring admissions coordinators can help you decide what treatment option is right for yourself or for your loved one. Our helpline is NOT affiliated with Alcoholics Anonymous/AA nor does AA sponsor the treatment options that are recommended when you call.

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