How to Apply Alcoholics Anonymous Step 6 In REAL Life

When you go to Alcoholics Anonymous, everything seems so easy in the meetings. You’re surrounded by supportive people and your sponsor.

Everyone in the room is dedicated to beating their alcoholism through their faith in God.

However, what happens when you leave that room?

In the real world, not everyone has that same spiritual outlook. People might be less tolerant of your behavior and your mistakes.

So how can you continue to work your way through the 12 step program without crashing and burning?

In particular, how do you live step six?

Understanding Step Six

According to the official program, step six asks that members “were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.”

So what does this mean?

It means you have to be willing to heal by offering yourself up to God.

This isn’t as easy as it sounds.

You’ll have to bear all of your dirty laundry out in the open for everyone to see.

But in the end, if you admit your shortcomings and are ready to become a better person, God will be there to help you.

Learn to Be Ready

Alcoholics Anonymous Step 6

Keeping a spirituality journal is an effective way to work on step 6.

One huge part of acting out step six in real life is temptation. Chances are, you might still be friends with people who enable your alcoholic behavior.

This means you aren’t ready to be healed.

So one big part of enacting step six is to eliminate these influences from your life. Try to connect with the friends you had before you became an alcoholic.

Use your family and your sponsor as a crutch to lean on whenever you have a craving or realize you’re in a bad place.

If you have a job, tell people you are reforming your ways, and ask them to help you eliminate temptation.

Fill any voids in your life with positivity. Make use of motivational post-it notes around your home, subscribe to daily happiness emails, or even call 800-839-1686 to speak with a representative whenever you’re feeling blue.

Learn to Accept God

Another hard part of step six that can be hard to manage in real life is accepting God.

Today’s world is extremely secular in design. It can be hard to find spiritual comfort. However, it’s essential to stay religious-minded in order to make it through the program.

Therefore, try to avoid things that could take you out of that mindset, such as poisonous television programs or movies. Additionally, if you have friends that are openly anti-religion, it might be best to stay away from them until you are feeling better.

6 Easy Ways to Make Alcohol Addiction a Thing of the Past

If you’re still living in a mindset of sin, then you aren’t ready to have God remove your character defects.

Another big help would to be going to church regularly and developing a relationship with the community. This will give you more opportunities to focus on spirituality in your daily life.

Even better, keep a spirituality journal and update your daily progress on accepting God in your life.

While God will help you on your journey away from alcoholism, it won’t be a sudden, overnight healing. The process takes time.

Learning to be healed is sometimes harder than the actual healing itself. However, with the help of your support system, anything is possible.

For more assistance tackling step six in real life, call 800-839-1686. A specialist will be able to offer tips and advice on how to alter your lifestyle as necessary.

References:

https://www.ivcc.edu/uploadedFiles/_faculty/_mangold/12%20Steps%20of%20AA.pdf

http://scholarship.law.cornell.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1006&context=cllsrp

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