How AA Alcoholics Can Find New Hobbies to Replace Addiction

Nearly all AA alcoholics who decide to quit drinking understand the many ways addiction can be time-consuming. This is especially true for those who quit, and have no idea what to do with their free time now that alcohol isn’t part of the equation. One of most exciting aspects about overcoming addiction is exploring new hobbies and interests that can replace drinking.

Are you struggling with addiction and aren’t sure where to turn for help? Call our 24/7 confidential helpline at 800-839-1686 to speak with an addiction counselor about your options for nearby 12-step AA meetings and alcohol rehab centers.

Have you recently decided to quit drinking, and need new interests to fill your time? Here are tips that can help you find new hobbies to replace alcohol addiction.

Experiment With Everything

If you’re in alcohol rehab, or have plans to attend rehab, participate in as many activities as possible to find a new favorite hobby. Try exercising regularly, or a variety of recreational therapies such as cooking, board games, and journaling. The more activities you try, the closer you’ll get to finding new, fun hobbies you truly enjoy.

Resume Old Hobbies and Interests

Replace Addiction

Spend time on hobbies that you used to enjoy.

Think back to what your life was like before you struggled with addiction. Which activities made you happiest? Take advantage of sobriety to resume old hobbies and interests you had prior to addiction that make you feel most like you.

For instance, if you played piano, consider taking more piano lessons to pick up where you left off. If you loved to go running, focus on improving your health throughout recovery so you can get back to running and fulfill new goals.

Attend Sober AA Events

Many AA groups host sober events and activities for recovering addicts, their friends and family, and other community members who support the fight for sobriety. These activities may involve going to sporting events or the movies, or fundraising events that support addiction recovery.

Going to AA events teaches you how to have fun without alcohol, while being surrounded by like-minded individuals also overcoming addiction. Plus, you might meet new people at these events who can introduce you to unique interests and hobbies you’ve never tried.

Spend Time Outdoors

Many recovering addicts say that outdoor activities help clear their heads, and keep them away from bars, restaurants, and other venues that serve alcohol. When you’re not sure what to do with your free time, leave your home and go for a walk. Or, try several outdoor activities such as hiking, biking, or swimming until you find the activity you enjoy most.

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Channel Your Energy Into Art

Some AA alcoholics find that writing and other forms of art therapy can help them overcome addiction. Plus, these hobbies are often time-consuming and can easily replace addiction as healthy, therapeutic interests.

Try channeling your struggles, frustrations, and other feelings about addiction into some form of art therapy. Paint pictures, write in a journal, or start a blog about your journey to sobriety, and about your experiences with AA. Art therapy can be highly effective at helping you overcome addiction, and is offered at many alcohol rehab centers.

If you or someone you care about is struggling with substance abuse, understand that help is just one phone call away. Call our 24/7 confidential helpline at 800-839-1686 to speak with an addiction counselor about AA Alcoholics meetings and rehab centers devoted to helping you achieve sobriety.

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If you're seeking addiction treatment for yourself or a loved one, the AlcoholicsAnonymous.com helpline offers a convenient and private solution to assist you. Our caring treatment advisors are ready to take your call anytime, day or night. Calls are answered 24/7 to discuss treatment and recovery options.

Your call is routed to a general helpline call center where caring admissions coordinators can help you decide what treatment option is right for yourself or for your loved one. Our helpline is NOT affiliated with Alcoholics Anonymous/AA nor does AA sponsor the treatment options that are recommended when you call.

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